'Flattery and reassurance are Lady Macbeth’s favourite persuasive tools – and isn’t the art of persuasion one we would all like to master?' Photo by Andrew Smith under Creative Commons licence.

'Flattery and reassurance are Lady Macbeth’s favourite persuasive tools – and isn’t the art of persuasion one we would all like to master?' Photo by Andrew Smith under Creative Commons licence.

'Flattery and reassurance are Lady Macbeth’s favourite persuasive tools – and isn’t the art of persuasion one we would all like to master?' Photo by Andrew Smith under Creative Commons licence.

As we celebrate the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth this year, English tutor and resource writer Genevieve White responds to some of the common problems teaching Shakespeare in the English language classroom.

'Lagos could be a lover, a friend, a shaman, an adversary, a politician, an illusion or the dream of a dreamer.' Photo by William Muzi, Creative Commons licence.

'Lagos could be a lover, a friend, a shaman, an adversary, a politician, an illusion or the dream of a dreamer.' Photo by William Muzi, Creative Commons licence.

'Lagos could be a lover, a friend, a shaman, an adversary, a politician, an illusion or the dream of a dreamer.' Photo by William Muzi, Creative Commons licence.

Two Lagosian writers explain what’s special about their city and how they captured that in stories performed as plays at the Lagos Theatre Festival last weekend. The stories had been selected as part of a British Council competition in 2013.

Some non-UK students may not feel they have ownership over Shakespeare's works, unless they speak in a pseudo-British accent. Photo by Calamity Meg under Creative Commons licence.

Some non-UK students may not feel they have ownership over Shakespeare's works, unless they speak in a pseudo-British accent. Photo by Calamity Meg under Creative Commons licence.

Some non-UK students may not feel they have ownership over Shakespeare's works, unless they speak in a pseudo-British accent. Photo by Calamity Meg under Creative Commons licence.

As we celebrate the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth, UK actor, author and producer Ben Crystal relates what it's like to speak the work of a playwright who has contributed so many new words and phrases to the English language.

Flyers or posters are not as effective as word of mouth when trying to attract an audience. Photo by Simon Li on Flickr

Flyers or posters are not as effective as word of mouth when trying to attract an audience. Photo by Simon Li on Flickr

Flyers or posters are not as effective as word of mouth when trying to attract an audience. Photo by Simon Li on Flickr

A panel of theatre practitioners at this year’s Edinburgh Showcase discusses how to market new projects and the importance of developing relationships between artist and audience.

'UK theatre has changed more in the last 15 years than in the previous 50.' Photo: 'Missing' by Gecko, © Richard Haughton

'UK theatre has changed more in the last 15 years than in the previous 50.' Photo: 'Missing' by Gecko, © Richard Haughton

'UK theatre has changed more in the last 15 years than in the previous 50.' Photo: 'Missing' by Gecko, © Richard Haughton

The UK theatre scene has for a long time had a reputation centred on Shakespeare. Two of the UK's most eminent critics and self-professed theatre addicts, Lyn Gardner (The Guardian) and Donald Hutera (The Times), talk at this year's Edinburgh Showcase about how the scene has changed.