Cul-de-sac: a street or passage closed at one end. Photo by Piermario on Flickr / Creative Commons.

Cul-de-sac: a street or passage closed at one end. Photo by Piermario on Flickr / CC.

Cul-de-sac: a street or passage closed at one end. Photo by Piermario on Flickr / Creative Commons.

How did so many French words and phrases make their way into the English language? Garry and Richard, English teachers at the British Council in Slovakia, delve into a bit of the history in their Language Corner radio show. Read an edited transcript below or scroll down to listen to the show.

'Prepositions mark special relationships between persons, objects, and locations.' Photo by uncoolbob on Flickr under Creative Commons.

'Prepositions mark special relationships between persons, objects, and locations.' Photo by uncoolbob on Flickr under Creative Commons.

'Prepositions mark special relationships between persons, objects, and locations.' Photo by uncoolbob on Flickr under Creative Commons.

Why are words like 'on', 'at', 'for' and 'about' so tricky for learners of English and how can teachers help? Adam Simpson, winner of the British Council’s Teaching English blog award for his infographic on prepositions, explains.

'The six-week programme is aimed at intermediate-level English language learners with a general interest in English language and culture.' Photo by Christopher Phin under Creative Commons licence.

'The six-week programme is aimed at intermediate-level English language learners with a general interest in English language and culture.' Photo by Christopher Phin under Creative Commons licence.

'The six-week programme is aimed at intermediate-level English language learners with a general interest in English language and culture.' Photo by Christopher Phin under Creative Commons licence.

From 1 September 2014, you can learn English through our first massive open online course (MOOC), ‘Exploring English: language and culture’ on FutureLearn. Irene Lavington of the British Council's English product development team explains how it works and why we are adding this new dimension to our English teaching.

Up to 70 per cent of all jobs advertised on tefl.com are for native English speaking teachers. Photo by Flazingo Photos on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Up to 70 per cent of all jobs advertised on tefl.com are for native English speaking teachers. Photo by Flazingo Photos on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Up to 70 per cent of all jobs advertised on tefl.com are for native English speaking teachers. Photo by Flazingo Photos on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

There are perceptions that native speakers of English make better English language teachers. Marek Kiczkowiak, winner of the British Council’s Teaching English blog award, argues that those perceptions need to change.

'The children are a delight, always smiling and so keen'. Screen shot from British Council video.

'The children are a delight, always smiling and so keen'. Screen shot from British Council video.

'The children are a delight, always smiling and so keen'. Screen shot from British Council video.

Can you imagine living and working in beautiful, tropical Malaysian Borneo? Rob Gordon is one of over 120 British Council mentors working with primary school teachers across the rural provinces of Sabah and Sarawak, helping them to develop their teaching methodology and improve their English language skills. Here, he describes a typical day in the job.