Setting goals is an essential step to becoming an autonomous learner. Photo by Matthias Werner on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Setting goals is an essential step to becoming an autonomous learner. Photo by Matthias Werner on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Setting goals is an essential step to becoming an autonomous learner. Photo by Matthias Werner on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

How can we get adult learners of English in a one-to-one classroom to take charge of their own learning? English language teacher and trainer Shanthi Streat, who won the latest British Council Teaching English blog award, argues that teachers need to use coaching techniques.

'We need to recognise the roles and functions that different varieties of English fulfil.' Photo by Marc Wathieu on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

'We need to recognise the roles and functions that different varieties of English fulfil.' Photo by Marc Wathieu on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

'We need to recognise the roles and functions that different varieties of English fulfil.' Photo by Marc Wathieu on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Ahead of UN English Language Day on 23 April, English language and linguistics specialist Dr Urszula Clark presents research on variations in the use of English and what these could mean for education policy and teachers of English. Her live-streamed British Council seminar is later today from 19:00 to 20:00 BST.

'Many online tools are easy to use and really support a child-centred approach to learning and teaching.' Photo by Tom Woodward on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

'Many online tools are easy to use and really support a child-centred approach to learning and teaching.' Photo by Brad Flickinger on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

'Many online tools are easy to use and really support a child-centred approach to learning and teaching.' Photo by Tom Woodward on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

How can ICT help children learn about people from other cultures? Teacher Wilma Gordon has this week won an eTwinning European prize for an online school project which joined together primary school pupils from around Europe. Here, she explains the benefits of using ICT in the classroom and tells us about some useful tools.

Warsaw (pictured) is one of the cities on the European continent where higher education institutions offer courses taught in English. Photo by Arian Zwegers / Creative Commons.

Warsaw (pictured) is one of the cities on the European continent where higher education institutions offer courses taught in English. Photo by Arian Zwegers / Creative Commons.

Warsaw (pictured) is one of the cities on the European continent where higher education institutions offer courses taught in English. Photo by Arian Zwegers / Creative Commons.

As more and more non-English speaking universities teach courses using English as the medium (or language) of instruction, the British Council’s Anne Wiseman and Adrian Odell look at some of the questions this raises for lecturers and their students. You can also stream the signature event on the subject at the IATEFL (International Association for Teachers of English

'To make the right impression, it's important to teach in a business-like way. This affects what you say, and how you behave, but also what you wear.' Photo by British Council.

'To make the right impression, it's important to teach in a business-like way. This affects what you say, and how you behave, but also what you wear.' Photo by British Council.

'To make the right impression, it's important to teach in a business-like way. This affects what you say, and how you behave, but also what you wear.' Photo by British Council.

How is teaching business English different from teaching general English? Teacher and trainer Gabrielle Jones, who won the most recent British Council Teaching English blog award, tells us how to succeed in the business English classroom. Comment below this post if you have further tips.