Up to 70 per cent of all jobs advertised on tefl.com are for native English speaking teachers. Photo by Flazingo Photos on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Up to 70 per cent of all jobs advertised on tefl.com are for native English speaking teachers. Photo by Flazingo Photos on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Up to 70 per cent of all jobs advertised on tefl.com are for native English speaking teachers. Photo by Flazingo Photos on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

There are perceptions that native speakers of English make better English language teachers. Marek Kiczkowiak, winner of the British Council’s Teaching English blog award, argues that those perceptions need to change.

'The children are a delight, always smiling and so keen'. Screen shot from British Council video.

'The children are a delight, always smiling and so keen'. Screen shot from British Council video.

'The children are a delight, always smiling and so keen'. Screen shot from British Council video.

Can you imagine living and working in beautiful, tropical Malaysian Borneo? Rob Gordon is one of over 120 British Council mentors working with primary school teachers across the rural provinces of Sabah and Sarawak, helping them to develop their teaching methodology and improve their English language skills. Here, he describes a typical day in the job.

'The internet is a window of opportunity for teachers, it enables us to develop, create, share and teach independently wherever and however we choose.' Photo by Daniele Pieroni on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

The internet enables teachers to develop, create, share and teach independently, wherever and however we choose.' Photo by Daniele Pieroni / Creative Commons licence.

'The internet is a window of opportunity for teachers, it enables us to develop, create, share and teach independently wherever and however we choose.' Photo by Daniele Pieroni on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Have you thought about teaching English online? Emma Segev, second-time winner of the British Council's Teaching English blog award, gives some practical tips and useful websites for getting started. 

'Prejudices about accents are undesirable, but powerful, and very easily learned.' Photo by Marc Wathieu on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

'Prejudices about accents are undesirable, but powerful, and very easily learned.' Photo by Marc Wathieu on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

'Prejudices about accents are undesirable, but powerful, and very easily learned.' Photo by Marc Wathieu on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Are some accents better than others? English language teacher and author Richard Cauldwell examines the prejudices against various English accents and the effect they can have on one's sense of self-worth. He will be presenting on this topic at a British Council seminar, live-streamed from London on 10 June.

Speaking more than one language fluently has some cognitive costs and many benefits. Image courtesy Quinn Dombrowski under Creative Commons license.

Speaking more than one language fluently has some cognitive costs and many benefits. Image courtesy Quinn Dombrowski under Creative Commons license.

Speaking more than one language fluently has some cognitive costs and many benefits. Image courtesy Quinn Dombrowski under Creative Commons license.

Language teacher and researcher Miguel Angel Muñoz explains the latest research on how being bilingual affects your brain, ahead of a British Council seminar in Cardiff on whether learning a foreign language makes you smarter. You can watch the live-streamed seminar on Tuesday, 3 June.