'Almost 1.5 million Muslim, Sikh and Hindu men volunteered in the Indian Expeditionary Force, which saw fighting on the Western Front, in East Africa, Mesopotamia, Egypt and Gallipoli'. Photo of members of a Waziri Khasadar, India 1917-19 courtesy of the Imperial War Museum.

'Almost 1.5 million Muslim, Sikh and Hindu men volunteered in the Indian Expeditionary Force, which saw fighting on the Western Front, in East Africa, Mesopotamia, Egypt and Gallipoli'. Photo of members of a Waziri Khasadar, India 1917-19 courtesy of the Imperial War Museum.

'Almost 1.5 million Muslim, Sikh and Hindu men volunteered in the Indian Expeditionary Force, which saw fighting on the Western Front, in East Africa, Mesopotamia, Egypt and Gallipoli'. Photo of members of a Waziri Khasadar, India 1917-19 courtesy of the Imperial War Museum.

The First World War had lasting consequences that extended far beyond Europe. It set in motion forces that developed into India's independence movement. Anne Bostanci, co-author of the British Council report, Remember the World as well as the War, ponders a promising emerging shift in the UK’s discussions about the First World War.

'This report clearly shows that the creative and cultural industries possess many assets, including creativity and respect for tradition.' Photo: Sharmeen Peshimam, for the British Council.

'This report clearly shows that the creative and cultural industries possess many assets, including creativity and respect for tradition.' Photo: Sharmeen Peshimam, for the British Council.

'This report clearly shows that the creative and cultural industries possess many assets, including creativity and respect for tradition.' Photo: Sharmeen Peshimam, for the British Council.

The British Council's Dee Lowry and Abdullah Qureshi summarise the main findings of our report on Pakistan's creative industries, published today.

'There’s not a single word in any of the languages I translate that can map perfectly onto a word in English. So it’s always interpretative, approximate, creative.' Photo by Erik Tjallinks under Creative Commons licence.

'There’s not a single word in any of the languages I translate that can map perfectly onto a word in English. So it’s always interpretative, approximate, creative.' Photo by Erik Tjallinks under Creative Commons licence.

'There’s not a single word in any of the languages I translate that can map perfectly onto a word in English. So it’s always interpretative, approximate, creative.' Photo by Erik Tjallinks under Creative Commons licence.

'Poetry is what gets lost in translation', the American poet Robert Frost is quoted as saying. So how do you translate literature effectively? The British Council's Ted Hodgkinson spoke to Daniel Hahn, director of the British Centre for Literary Translation, and Urdu language translator Fahmida Riaz, during a literary translation workshop taking place in Karachi on 13-17 October.

'The recruitment of talented international postgraduates has become a strategic priority for institutions and governments globally.' Photo: Asim Bharwani on Flickr/CC

'The recruitment of talented international postgraduates has become a strategic priority for institutions and governments globally.' Photo: Asim Bharwani on Flickr/CC

'The recruitment of talented international postgraduates has become a strategic priority for institutions and governments globally.' Photo: Asim Bharwani on Flickr/CC

Universities increasingly depend on Chinese and Indian postgraduates, but what other markets are opening up? The British Council's Zainab Malik, author of a new report about student mobility trends between now and 2024, says institutions and policy-makers need to attract students from other expanding economies.

'When you offer something beautiful to somebody, their first instinct is to accept it. Every form of art starts with a point of beauty.' Photo by The Lowry on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

'When you offer something beautiful to somebody, their first instinct is to accept it. Every form of art starts with a point of beauty.' Photo by The Lowry on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

'When you offer something beautiful to somebody, their first instinct is to accept it. Every form of art starts with a point of beauty.' Photo by The Lowry on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

What will audiences in Bangladesh make of a contemporary dance performance about their homeland? The British Council's Eeshita Azad explains why the arts can help people see their country from a different point of view. DESH will be performed on 18 and 19 September at the Shilpakala Academy, Dhaka.