'There’s not a single word in any of the languages I translate that can map perfectly onto a word in English. So it’s always interpretative, approximate, creative.' Photo by Erik Tjallinks under Creative Commons licence.

'There’s not a single word in any of the languages I translate that can map perfectly onto a word in English. So it’s always interpretative, approximate, creative.' Photo by Erik Tjallinks under Creative Commons licence.

'There’s not a single word in any of the languages I translate that can map perfectly onto a word in English. So it’s always interpretative, approximate, creative.' Photo by Erik Tjallinks under Creative Commons licence.

'Poetry is what gets lost in translation', the American poet Robert Frost is quoted as saying. So how do you translate literature effectively? The British Council's Ted Hodgkinson spoke to Daniel Hahn, director of the British Centre for Literary Translation, and Urdu language translator Fahmida Riaz, during a literary translation workshop taking place in Karachi on 13-17 October.

'The recruitment of talented international postgraduates has become a strategic priority for institutions and governments globally.' Photo: Asim Bharwani on Flickr/CC

'The recruitment of talented international postgraduates has become a strategic priority for institutions and governments globally.' Photo: Asim Bharwani on Flickr/CC

'The recruitment of talented international postgraduates has become a strategic priority for institutions and governments globally.' Photo: Asim Bharwani on Flickr/CC

Universities increasingly depend on Chinese and Indian postgraduates, but what other markets are opening up? The British Council's Zainab Malik, author of a new report about student mobility trends between now and 2024, says institutions and policy-makers need to attract students from other expanding economies.

'When you offer something beautiful to somebody, their first instinct is to accept it. Every form of art starts with a point of beauty.' Photo by The Lowry on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

'When you offer something beautiful to somebody, their first instinct is to accept it. Every form of art starts with a point of beauty.' Photo by The Lowry on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

'When you offer something beautiful to somebody, their first instinct is to accept it. Every form of art starts with a point of beauty.' Photo by The Lowry on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

What will audiences in Bangladesh make of a contemporary dance performance about their homeland? The British Council's Eeshita Azad explains why the arts can help people see their country from a different point of view. DESH will be performed on 18 and 19 September at the Shilpakala Academy, Dhaka.

'For our young to learn tolerance and understand the value of peace, they need to think and talk about conflict.' Photo by The U.S. Army on Flickr under Creative Commons.

'For our young to learn tolerance and understand the value of peace, they need to think and talk about conflict.' Photo by The U.S. Army on Flickr under Creative Commons.

'For our young to learn tolerance and understand the value of peace, they need to think and talk about conflict.' Photo by The U.S. Army on Flickr under Creative Commons.

The means of teaching can greatly affect the outcomes, and teaching about conflict is no exception. Meena Megha Malhotra of the Seagull Foundation, who helped develop one of several e-modules on conflict for schools as part of the Teaching Divided Histories project, explains the benefits of using digital technology in

‘In the mountain areas, we have a lack of transportation and infrastructure.’ Photo of Balochistan village by Ahsan under Creative Commons licence.

‘In the mountain areas, we have a lack of transportation and infrastructure.’ Photo of Balochistan village by Ahsan under Creative Commons licence.

‘In the mountain areas, we have a lack of transportation and infrastructure.’ Photo of Balochistan village by Ahsan under Creative Commons licence.

As we publish a report assessing disability in Pakistan today, the British Council's Dee Lowry hears from Abia Akram and others about what it's like to live as a person with disability* in Pakistan, and examines how the report can shape future policies and discussions.