"Bats use echolocation to hunt small, fast-moving insects in the dark." (Photo by e_monk under Creative Commons license)

"Bats use echolocation to hunt small, fast-moving insects in the dark." (Photo by e_monk under Creative Commons license)

"Bats use echolocation to hunt small, fast-moving insects in the dark." (Photo by e_monk under Creative Commons license)

Dr Michael Antoniou, an expert in radar and remote sensing at the University of Birmingham, explains how humans use similar cognitive techniques as bats and dolphins to 'see' using sound. His team's international research is funded by the Global Innovation Initiative, which opens a second call for proposals today.

The rotation speed of stars close to the edge of a galaxy gives us clues about 'dark matter'. Photo by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center under Creative Commons licence.

The rotation speed of stars close to the edge of a galaxy gives us clues about 'dark matter'. Photo by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center under Creative Commons licence.

The rotation speed of stars close to the edge of a galaxy gives us clues about 'dark matter'. Photo by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center under Creative Commons licence.

You've probably heard of it, but do you know what dark matter is? Bogdan Ghiorghiu, winner of science communication competition FameLab in Romania, explains. Bogdan is competing at the FameLab international final in Cheltenham on 3-5 June 2014.

'Liver cancer is extremely prevalent in people whose staple diet is uncooked fish that harbour the parasitic liver worm, Opisthorchis viverrini.' Photo by A J Cann on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

'Liver cancer is extremely prevalent in people whose staple diet is uncooked fish that harbour the parasitic liver worm, Opisthorchis viverrini.' Photo by A J Cann on Flickr / Creative Commons licence.

'Liver cancer is extremely prevalent in people whose staple diet is uncooked fish that harbour the parasitic liver worm, Opisthorchis viverrini.' Photo by A J Cann on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Why does south-east Asia have such a high prevalence of bile duct liver cancer? Dr Michael Smout of James Cook University, winner of science communication competition FameLab in Australia, explains the link between the deadly disease and a parasitic worm found in uncooked fish. Michael is competing at the FameLab international final in Cheltenham on 3-5 June 2014.

'Wouldn't it be good to take advantage of the CO2 contained in the exhaust fumes and transform it into something useful?'

'Wouldn't it be good to take advantage of the CO2 contained in the exhaust fumes and transform it into something useful?'

'Wouldn't it be good to take advantage of the CO2 contained in the exhaust fumes and transform it into something useful?'

Can science imitate nature to combat global warming and tackle our energy problems? Nick Moustakas, winner of science communication competition FameLab in Greece, looks at the science behind artificial photosynthesis. He is at the international FameLab final in Cheltenham on 3-5 June 2014.

'The best way to activate brown fat is to be exposed to cold temperatures' (Photo courtesy Doug Brown under Creative Commons license)

'The best way to activate brown fat is to be exposed to cold temperatures' (Photo courtesy Doug Brown under Creative Commons license)

'The best way to activate brown fat is to be exposed to cold temperatures' (Photo courtesy Doug Brown under Creative Commons license)

Brown fat is a special type of body fat, which can actually help us lose weight. Ricardo Moure Ortega, a PhD student at the University of Barcelona and winner of the FameLab science communication competition final in Spain, explains. He will join the international finals in Cheltenham on 3-5 June 2014.