New forms of ‘English’ are swiftly evolving. Photo by John Keogh under Creative Commons licence.

New forms of ‘English’ are swiftly evolving. Photo by John Keogh under Creative Commons licence.

New forms of ‘English’ are swiftly evolving. Photo by John Keogh under Creative Commons licence.

Linguistics expert David Crystal is in Russia to give a series of lectures. At the UK-Russia Linguistic Symposium at the Russian State University for the Humanities in Moscow, he described 'the future of Englishes' and the evolution of global varieties of English across the world. Keira Ives-Keeler of the British Council in Russia explains.

Russian audiences initially struggled to warm to Shakespeare’s rugged and emotion-filled plays, full of death, betrayal and skulduggery. Photo: Vladimir Vyatkin, the Chekhov ITF.

Russian audiences initially struggled to warm to Shakespeare’s rugged and emotion-filled plays, full of death, betrayal and skulduggery. Photo: Vladimir Vyatkin, the Chekhov ITF.

Russian audiences initially struggled to warm to Shakespeare’s rugged and emotion-filled plays, full of death, betrayal and skulduggery. Photo: Vladimir Vyatkin, the Chekhov ITF.

Shakespeare translations first reached Russia in the 18th century. Reactions were as mixed then as they are effusive today. The British Council's Keira Ives-Keeler walks us through the history of Shakespeare's Russian reception following the Shakespeare Globe's sold-out performance of Hamlet last month and ahead of the company's return to Moscow in the autumn.

Still from 'The Golden Age of the Russian avant-garde' exhibition. Copyright: Central Exhibition Hall, Manege, Moscow

Still from 'The Golden Age of the Russian avant-garde' exhibition. Copyright: Central Exhibition Hall, Manege, Moscow

Still from 'The Golden Age of the Russian avant-garde' exhibition. Copyright: Central Exhibition Hall, Manege, Moscow

Have you ever imagined a painting coming to life? From 14 April, art fans in Russia will be able to do just that, when Peter Greenaway and Saskia Boddeke's 'The Golden Age of the Russian Avant-Garde' opens at the Moscow Manege exhibition venue, supported by British Council Russia. The exhibition animates art from Russia's influential avant-garde movement, as the British

Akram Khan’s latest work iTMOi (In the Mind of Igor) will travel to Russia as part of the programme; photo © J Louis Fernandez

Akram Khan’s latest work iTMOi (In the Mind of Igor) will travel to Russia as part of the programme; photo © J Louis Fernandez

Akram Khan’s latest work iTMOi (In the Mind of Igor) will travel to Russia as part of the programme; photo © J Louis Fernandez

2014 is the UK-Russia Year of Culture, a great opportunity for the two countries to come together and find out about each other's cultures outside the media. Our director in Russia, Paul de Quincey, explains the relationship and why we have reason to look up.

Some of the things you can do as an international scientist is study luminescence in sea creatures and dance with Moscow ballerinas. Photo by TimOve on Flickr under Creative Commons

Some of the things you can do as an international scientist is study luminescence in sea creatures and dance with Moscow ballerinas. Photo by TimOve on Flickr under Creative Commons

Some of the things you can do as an international scientist is study luminescence in sea creatures and dance with Moscow ballerinas. Photo by TimOve on Flickr under Creative Commons

As a scientist, you have to travel and co-operate world-wide, says Professor David Phillips CBE. Here, he recounts how he made friends with Soviet scientists and authorities when he went on a year-long fellowship to Moscow as a young man. He presented this story at a British Council session during the London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF) last week.