More than two million people have fled Syria since the beginning of the conflict in 2011. Photo by Marc Veraart under Creative Commons licence.

More than two million people have fled Syria since the beginning of the conflict in 2011. Photo by Marc Veraart under Creative Commons licence.

More than two million people have fled Syria since the beginning of the conflict in 2011. Photo by Marc Veraart under Creative Commons licence.

When a country is at war, what happens to its universities? And why does it matter to its young citizens? The British Council's Sally Ward describes the heartbreak facing the young Syrians who wish to educate themselves and rebuild their country.

Half-finished construction on Benghazi University in 2012 (Photo by BBC World Service under Creative Commons licence)

Half-finished construction on Benghazi University in 2012 (Photo by BBC World Service under Creative Commons licence)

Half-finished construction on Benghazi University in 2012 (Photo by BBC World Service under Creative Commons licence)

In the aftermath of recent violence, the Libyan government is trying to repair and improve its higher education sector to meet massive demand from the country's young population. The British Council's Dr John Law explains how Libya is developing its universities.

A particular smell could make you stressed, happy or even fall in love. Photo by Mitchell Joyce on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

A particular smell could make you stressed, happy or even fall in love. Photo by Mitchell Joyce on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

A particular smell could make you stressed, happy or even fall in love. Photo by Mitchell Joyce on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

How do smells affect our emotions? Ahmed Badr, winner of the international science communication competition FameLab in Egypt, explains his presentation on the science of smells and tells us why science communication is important for his country. Ahmed will join the international finals in Cheltenham on 3-5 June 2014.

Still from UK choreographer Russell Maliphant's show 'Still Current'. Photo: Warren Du Preez & Nick Thornton Jones

Still from UK choreographer Russell Maliphant's show 'Still Current'. Photo: Warren Du Preez & Nick Thornton Jones

Still from UK choreographer Russell Maliphant's show 'Still Current'. Photo: Warren Du Preez & Nick Thornton Jones

Following yesterday's sold-out performance of UK choreographer Russell Maliphant's 'Still Current' in Ramallah, the British Council's Suha Khuffash explains what dance, and especially contemporary dance, means to Palestinians.

'I tried to find a metaphorical name for the magazine, which would mean moving towards a positive future.' Dhow off the Jumiera Palm, Dubai (image courtesy Nico Crisafulli under Creative Commons license)

'I tried to find a metaphorical name for the magazine, which would mean moving towards a positive future.' Dhow off the Jumiera Palm, Dubai (image courtesy Nico Crisafulli under Creative Commons license)

'I tried to find a metaphorical name for the magazine, which would mean moving towards a positive future.' Dhow off the Jumiera Palm, Dubai (image courtesy Nico Crisafulli under Creative Commons license)

Have you ever dreamed of running your own creative business? If so, Iman Ben Chaibah, a member of the British Council's Young Creative Entrepreneur network, has tips on how to do it. She explains how she successfully set up Sail, an online magazine written by young Emiratis in English.