37 per cent of UK respondents were considering studying overseas, an increase of 17 per cent on the previous year. Photo by Shuji Moriwaki on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

37 per cent of UK respondents were considering studying overseas, an increase of 17 per cent on the previous year. Photo by Shuji Moriwaki on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

37 per cent of UK respondents were considering studying overseas, an increase of 17 per cent on the previous year. Photo by Shuji Moriwaki on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

More UK students are considering studying overseas this year than last, but there are still factors holding them back. The British Council's Elizabeth Shepherd summarises a report looking at the perceived barriers and changing attitudes to international study. The report, which draws on survey data from UK and US students, is published today.

'Today’s widely accessible e-communication technologies could be leveraged to get students from different countries working together.' Photo by Michael Wyszomierski on Flickr / Creative Commons

'Today’s widely accessible e-communication technologies could be leveraged to get students from different countries working together.' Photo by Michael Wyszomierski on Flickr / Creative Commons

'Today’s widely accessible e-communication technologies could be leveraged to get students from different countries working together.' Photo by Michael Wyszomierski on Flickr / Creative Commons

How important are intercultural skills and proficiency in foreign languages to compete in the modern world? An essay competition, sponsored by Generation UK, invited UK students to tackle the question: How can our education better prepare us to compete in an increasingly globalised world? Read extracts from the winning essays below. The winners will participate in our UK-China Student Forum at Tsinghua University on

Universities and policy makers in the sector consider internationalisation to be one of the most significant aspects of an institutional strategy. Photo: Mat Wright

Universities and policy makers in the sector consider internationalisation to be one of the most significant aspects of an institutional strategy. Photo: Mat Wright

Universities and policy makers in the sector consider internationalisation to be one of the most significant aspects of an institutional strategy. Photo: Mat Wright

Universities worldwide are increasingly opening their doors to peer institutions in other countries. But the enthusiasm for internationalisation is also accompanied by reservations. Ross Hudson, co-author of a report called Internationalization of Higher Education: Growing expectations, fundamental values, IAU 4th Global Survey and published today, summarises the main findings.

Formal meetings with the Burmese president are conducted as above. This is where the chair of the British Council announced the launch later this year of a £4.2m project called 'English for Education College Trainers'. Photo by Thaik Htun.

Formal meetings with the Burmese president are conducted as above. This is where the chair of the British Council announced the launch later this year of a £4.2m project called 'English for Education College Trainers'. Photo by Thaik Htun.

Formal meetings with the Burmese president are conducted as above. This is where the chair of the British Council announced the launch later this year of a £4.2m project called 'English for Education College Trainers'. Photo by Thaik Htun.

Decades of military rule and isolation have had a detrimental effect on Burma. Thanks to a recent political transition, however, and a new desire for reform and international contact, Burma's future is looking brighter. Vernon Ellis, Chair of the British Council, visited senior Burmese officials last week and tells us why the country places special hope in its education sector,

Warsaw (pictured) is one of the cities on the European continent where higher education institutions offer courses taught in English. Photo by Arian Zwegers / Creative Commons.

Warsaw (pictured) is one of the cities on the European continent where higher education institutions offer courses taught in English. Photo by Arian Zwegers / Creative Commons.

Warsaw (pictured) is one of the cities on the European continent where higher education institutions offer courses taught in English. Photo by Arian Zwegers / Creative Commons.

As more and more non-English speaking universities teach courses using English as the medium (or language) of instruction, the British Council’s Anne Wiseman and Adrian Odell look at some of the questions this raises for lecturers and their students. You can also stream the signature event on the subject at the IATEFL (International Association for Teachers of English