The state of Islamophobia in the U.S. has taken a turn for the worse: Only 30 percent of the American public had a favorable opinion of Islam in August 2010, down from 41 percent in July 2005, according to the Pew Research Center. This finding and others like it form the basis of the first in-depth look at Islamophobia

A new report on Islamophobia highlights a downturn in the favorable opinion of Islam in the United States since 2005. The University of California Berkeley’s Center for Race and Gender and the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), co-authors of the report, have used information gathered by other credible organizations (such as the Pew Research Center) that have conducted polling into American attitudes

Source: Zeinab Mohamed/Flickr

Egyptians queue up to vote outside a language school in Giza.

Source: Zeinab Mohamed/Flickr

No recent event has done more to change perceptions of Muslims in the West than the Arab Spring. Images of young male Muslim terrorists or of Muslim women clad in burqas have yielded to those of the peaceful protestors in Tahrir Square who yearn for the kinds of values and freedoms that those in the West see as the cornerstones