'The DPRK is very cautious about any imagery or any view of itself which doesn’t conform to the statist ideal'. Photo by Nick Danziger.

'The DPRK is very cautious about any imagery or any view of itself which doesn’t conform to the statist ideal'. Photo by Nick Danziger.

'The DPRK is very cautious about any imagery or any view of itself which doesn’t conform to the statist ideal'. Photo by Nick Danziger.

In August 2013, the British Council’s Visual Arts Director, Andrea Rose, along with photographer Nick Danziger and writer Rory MacLean, travelled to North Korea at the invitation of the DPRK (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) authorities. They set out to provide a view of the people and the country with the aim of informing future discussion about this isolated state.

'Clearly, you cannot talk about the First World War without talking about Germany' Photo: German ring ‘Vaterlandsdank 1914’ (loosely: gratitude from the fatherland), which was awarded for the donation of precious metals to the war effort. © Max Ackermann

'Clearly, you cannot talk about the First World War without talking about Germany' Photo: German ring ‘Vaterlandsdank 1914’ (loosely: gratitude from the fatherland), which was awarded for the donation of precious metals to the war effort. © Max Ackermann

'Clearly, you cannot talk about the First World War without talking about Germany' Photo: German ring ‘Vaterlandsdank 1914’ (loosely: gratitude from the fatherland), which was awarded for the donation of precious metals to the war effort. © Max Ackermann

As we mark 100 years since the start of the First World War in 1914, the British Council's Anne Bostanci argues how it's no longer useful to think about a country's contribution and loss in national terms.

'The generation that witnessed Partition will not be with us much longer'. Photo of Karachi Empress Market by Umair Mohsin under Creative Commons licence.

'The generation that witnessed Partition will not be with us much longer'. Photo of Karachi Empress Market by Umair Mohsin under Creative Commons licence.

'The generation that witnessed Partition will not be with us much longer'. Photo of Karachi Empress Market by Umair Mohsin under Creative Commons licence.

Many of us learn history through official history books, but The Citizens Archive of Pakistan (CAP) is asking Pakistanis to submit their own stories and photos to document the country's rich history from Partition to today. Journalist Sanam Maher picks a few examples from the archive and explains

Many young Pakistanis want to turn away from violence in their communities. Photo by Benny Lin on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Many young Pakistanis want to turn away from violence in their communities. Photo by Benny Lin on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Many young Pakistanis want to turn away from violence in their communities. Photo by Benny Lin on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

The British Council in Pakistan has launched a report examining how violence shapes young Pakistanis' lives. Next Generation: Insecure Lives, Untold Stories presents 1,800 stories from young people across Pakistan, expert interviews, and a national survey on the effects of political, criminal and domestic violence. Shaheryar Zaidi of the British Council in Pakistan explains.

1.4-1.5 million men from India served for Britain in the war. Photo of wounded Indian soldiers in a French village courtesy of Imperial War Museum.

1.4-1.5 million men from India served for Britain in the war. Photo of wounded Indian soldiers in a French village courtesy of Imperial War Museum.

1.4-1.5 million men from India served for Britain in the war. Photo of wounded Indian soldiers in a French village courtesy of Imperial War Museum.

The First World War started 100 years ago and forever changed the world, not just Europe. The British Council's Anne Bostanci, co-author of the report Remember the World as well as the War, published today, gives us a glimpse into the war's global scale and legacy.