'Galleries are keen to curate their stands to make them more like exhibitions than shop fronts.' Photo of Frieze brochure by Emma Gifford-Mead

'Galleries are keen to curate their stands to make them more like exhibitions than shop fronts.' Photo of Frieze brochure by Emma Gifford-Mead

'Galleries are keen to curate their stands to make them more like exhibitions than shop fronts.' Photo of Frieze brochure by Emma Gifford-Mead

What actually happens at an international art fair? Emma Gifford-Mead of the British Council's visual arts department explains what goes on behind the scenes and which artists to look out for at Frieze London, which runs this week.

'There’s not a single word in any of the languages I translate that can map perfectly onto a word in English. So it’s always interpretative, approximate, creative.' Photo by Erik Tjallinks under Creative Commons licence.

'There’s not a single word in any of the languages I translate that can map perfectly onto a word in English. So it’s always interpretative, approximate, creative.' Photo by Erik Tjallinks under Creative Commons licence.

'There’s not a single word in any of the languages I translate that can map perfectly onto a word in English. So it’s always interpretative, approximate, creative.' Photo by Erik Tjallinks under Creative Commons licence.

'Poetry is what gets lost in translation', the American poet Robert Frost is quoted as saying. So how do you translate literature effectively? The British Council's Ted Hodgkinson spoke to Daniel Hahn, director of the British Centre for Literary Translation, and Urdu language translator Fahmida Riaz, during a literary translation workshop taking place in Karachi on 13-17 October.

'I grew up in a world where nobody could put the two things together: an enjoyable job and good pay.' © Anita Schiffer-Fuchs / taken at the British Council Literature Seminar in 2003

'I grew up in a world where nobody could put the two things together: an enjoyable job and good pay.' © Anita Schiffer-Fuchs / taken at the British Council Literature Seminar in 2003

'I grew up in a world where nobody could put the two things together: an enjoyable job and good pay.' © Anita Schiffer-Fuchs / taken at the British Council Literature Seminar in 2003

John Burnside grew up in Scotland and worked as a software engineer before dedicating his time to writing poetry and fiction. He recently worked with inmates at Moabit, one of Germany’s largest prison remand centres. The T.S. Eliot Prize-winning poet tells us about working in prisons, family life and the eeriness of English suburbs.

'I wanted to explore the simplicity of the song' Photo: Saint Saviour

'I wanted to explore the simplicity of the song' Photo: Saint Saviour

'I wanted to explore the simplicity of the song' Photo: Saint Saviour

Saint Saviour, formerly of Groove Armada, is preparing to release her second album, In the Seams, on 3 November and tells us why she's moved away from electronic music this time. Scroll down to listen to the interview and two of the songs recorded for The Selector, our global radio show for new UK music.

"If you've got confidence that what you're doing is good and you feel it's a genuine expression, there's always a way to make it work." Photo of Matt Black by Martin Steinmetz

"If you've got confidence that what you're doing is good and you feel it's a genuine expression, there's always a way to make it work." Photo of Matt Black by Martin Steinmetz

"If you've got confidence that what you're doing is good and you feel it's a genuine expression, there's always a way to make it work." Photo of Matt Black by Martin Steinmetz

Matt Black, co-founder of record label Ninja Tune, spoke to Martin Steinmetz of the British Council's office in Germany about the label's success over the years.