There are hundreds of mobile apps available for English language students. Photo by Chris Whittle, used with permission.

There are hundreds of mobile apps available for English language students. Photo by Chris Whittle, used with permission.

There are hundreds of mobile apps available for English language students. Photo by Chris Whittle, used with permission.

Mobile devices and apps are changing the way people learn English. Teacher Emma Segev, who won last month's British Council Teaching English blog award, shares her ideas for learning English on the go. Comment below this post if you have further tips.

University seminars can be humourous places. Photo by Arnett Gill on Flickr / Creative Commons licence.

University seminars can be humourous places. Photo by Arnett Gill on Flickr / Creative Commons licence.

University seminars can be humourous places. Photo by Arnett Gill on Flickr / Creative Commons licence.

Can English language students be 'trained' in humour? Ahead of her live-streamed British Council seminar on Wednesday, 26 February, teacher and English for Academic Purposes (EAP) specialist Emma Greenhalgh tells us why humour should be incorporated into language learning.

Students need good listening skills to interpret what people are saying in various academic situations. Photo by Melvin Gaal on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Students need good listening skills to interpret what people are saying in various academic situations. Photo by Melvin Gaal on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Students need good listening skills to interpret what people are saying in various academic situations. Photo by Melvin Gaal on Flickr under Creative Commons licence.

Effective listening is essential in an academic context. English for Academic Purposes (EAP) specialist and author Edward de Chazal tells us how English language teachers can help students prepare. His live-streamed British Council seminar is on Wednesday, 26 February.

The number of women in senior leadership does not match the high number of women students. Photo by Texas A&M Engineering under Creative Commons licence.

The number of women in senior leadership does not match the high number of women students. Photo by Texas A&M Engineering under Creative Commons licence.

The number of women in senior leadership does not match the high number of women students. Photo by Texas A&M Engineering under Creative Commons licence.

More women and ethnic minorities enrol in higher education in the UK, US, Australia and Canada than ever. But do universities there mirror this change when recruiting for leadership positions? Philip Esterhuizen (University of Leeds) and the British Council’s Sophia Chan-Combrink explain the issues at our global education dialogue in Hong Kong on 17-18

'The challenge is not always related to size as it is to our ability to make sense of the available data.' Photo by Adrian S Jones, Creative Commons licence.

'The challenge is not always related to size as it is to our ability to make sense of the available data.' Photo by Adrian S Jones, Creative Commons licence.

'The challenge is not always related to size as it is to our ability to make sense of the available data.' Photo by Adrian S Jones, Creative Commons licence.

Every year, we generate greater amounts of data. This presents opportunities and risks for businesses, public services and citizens. Dr Abdelaziz Berrado (Ecole Mohammadia d'Ingenieurs, Rabat, Morocco) gives us an update on big data and data science while academics and others discuss the topic at the UK-Morocco big data workshop, Imperial College London, 17-19