Curator Kimberley Moulton at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at Cambridge (image credit: Ali Clark)

Curator Kimberley Moulton at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at Cambridge (image credit: Ali Clark)

Curator Kimberley Moulton at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at Cambridge (image credit: Ali Clark)

Kimberley Moulton, an Australian museum curator of Aboriginal heritage, writes about her visit to the UK as part of the British Council's ACCELERATE programme for Aboriginal leaders in the creative industries. She explains how indigenous people can reclaim the way they are represented in museums by reframing the way their cultural artefacts are displayed.

'Hands across the divide’ sculpture in Derry~Londonderry, the city where Mariane shared her personal experience of conflict in November 2013; copyright: Derry Visitor and Convention Bureau, used with permission

'Hands across the divide’ sculpture in Derry~Londonderry, the city where Mariane shared her personal experience of conflict in November 2013; copyright: Derry Visitor and Convention Bureau, used with permission

'Hands across the divide’ sculpture in Derry~Londonderry, the city where Mariane shared her personal experience of conflict in November 2013; copyright: Derry Visitor and Convention Bureau, used with permission

Mariane Pearl was five months pregnant when her husband, the US journalist Daniel Pearl, was captured and beheaded by a militant Islamic fundamentalist group in February 2002. She is best known for her related memoir 'A Mighty Heart', which was made into an award-winning film.

'Helping the class to become more self-assured in English also means they can converse more confidently with their own children in a language that their sons and daughters have taken in their stride since birth.' Photo courtesy of the author.

'Helping the class to become more self-assured in English also means they can converse more confidently with their own children in a language that their sons and daughters have taken in their stride since birth.' Photo courtesy of the author.

'Helping the class to become more self-assured in English also means they can converse more confidently with their own children in a language that their sons and daughters have taken in their stride since birth.' Photo courtesy of the author.

Rachel Thomas teaches a weekly ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) class in Streatham, South London. She recounts here how she got into voluntary teaching and shares both tips and experiences of teaching English in her local community.

Stewart, a UK teacher with children in a Lebanese school (image courtesy of the author)

Stewart, a UK teacher with children in a Lebanese school (image courtesy of the author)

Stewart, a UK teacher with children in a Lebanese school (image courtesy of the author)

‘What would it feel like to leave everything behind?’ In the wake of the Syria conflict, Stewart Cook, teacher at Frances Olive Anderson primary school, posed the question to his class of eight- to nine-year-olds. A year since he started a Connecting Classrooms partnership with a Lebanese school hosting 40 per cent refugees, he explains how the project has

Teacher Hala Arraby observed that her students were more interested in learning English when she used technology. Photo by Yong Xin / Creative Commons

Teacher Hala Arraby observed that her students were more interested in learning English when she used technology. Photo by Yong Xin / Creative Commons

Teacher Hala Arraby observed that her students were more interested in learning English when she used technology. Photo by Yong Xin / Creative Commons

This week, the UK and Israel agreed to work together on a project to train Israeli teachers. We asked Israeli teacher Hala Arraby, who took part in our Routes to Excellence teacher training programme, how it works and why teachers should develop their digital literacy.