Studies have shown that international mobility drastically improves young scientists' careers. Photo by Kuster & Wildhaber Photography / Creative Commons

Studies have shown that international mobility drastically improves young scientists' careers. Photo by Kuster & Wildhaber Photography / Creative Commons

Studies have shown that international mobility drastically improves young scientists' careers. Photo by Kuster & Wildhaber Photography / Creative Commons

Following her appearance at the World Science Forum in Rio de Janeiro this week, the British Council's Head of Science Dr Claire McNulty answers what young scientists can do to sustain their careers.

Cell delivery systems for treatment of stroke, Parkinson’s Disease and bone regeneration are under development. Photo of nano-sized plastic particles (cell delivery system) courtesy of the author.

Cell delivery systems for treatment of stroke, Parkinson’s Disease and bone regeneration are under development. Photo of nano-sized plastic particles (cell delivery system) courtesy of the author.

Cell delivery systems for treatment of stroke, Parkinson’s Disease and bone regeneration are under development. Photo of nano-sized plastic particles (cell delivery system) courtesy of the author.

The promises of regenerative medicine cause both hope and fear. Professor Kevin Shakesheff, who spoke at our 'Unlocking the secrets behind regenerative medicine' event in London yesterday, explains some of the controversy. The event is part of BIRAX, our UK-Israel initiative to support international research into some of the world's most dreadful diseases.

Visuals may be better suited for some students to memorise grammar and vocabulary than talking. Photo by Sarah C / Creative Commons

Visuals may be better suited for some students to memorise grammar and vocabulary than talking. Photo by Sarah C / Creative Commons

Visuals may be better suited for some students to memorise grammar and vocabulary than talking. Photo by Sarah C / Creative Commons

Different learners require different learning methods, so we shouldn’t always favour a ‘communicative’ approach over an ‘academic’ one, argues Rupert Lezemore. He is speaking at our seminar for English language teachers (ticket link) in Glasgow on 26 November 2013.

Teachers are helping students to use English as a lingua franca (photo by Ivan McClellan photography)

Teachers are helping students to use English as a lingua franca (photo by Ivan McClellan photography)

Teachers are helping students to use English as a lingua franca (photo by Ivan McClellan photography)

Katy Simpson Davies and Laura Patsko will run a British Council Seminar in Glasgow on 26 November 2013 on teaching pronunciation and listening in an ELF context (English as a lingua franca). They explain how teachers can teach ELF in their classrooms.

Introducing students to a new language in primary school will make it easier for them to learn more languages later. Photo: Mat Wright

Introducing students to a new language in primary school will make it easier for them to learn more languages later. Photo: Mat Wright

Introducing students to a new language in primary school will make it easier for them to learn more languages later. Photo: Mat Wright

For the last day of International Education Week (18-24 November 2013), we asked Pauline Bourbigot, a former British Council French language assistant at several primary schools in Angus, Scotland, to share some tips and why she thinks language learning from an early age is so important.