Skills training has come a long way since 1940, when these apprentices were learning on the job in a steel plant (image credit: National Film Board of Canada)

Skills training has come a long way since 1940, when these apprentices were learning on the job in a steel plant (image credit: National Film Board of Canada)

Skills training has come a long way since 1940, when these apprentices were learning on the job in a steel plant (image credit: National Film Board of Canada)

Simon Witts led the Employer Engagement and Apprenticeships Seminar for ministers, government officials and other delegates from South America, the Caribbean, Europe, the Middle East, Africa and South Asia in London this week. He explains why governments should engage employers in national skills programmes, alongside their in-house training.

Damien Hirst, Away from the Flock (Divided), 1995, glass, painted steel, silicone, acrylic, plastic cable ties, stainless steel, sheep and formaldehyde solution, two parts, each: 1180 x 1860 x 513 mm | 46.5 x 73.2 x 20 in, Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates, © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2013

Damien Hirst, Away from the Flock (Divided), 1995, glass, painted steel, silicone, acrylic, plastic cable ties, stainless steel, sheep and formaldehyde solution, two parts, each: 1180 x 1860 x 513 mm | 46.5 x 73.2 x 20 in, Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates, © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2013

Damien Hirst, Away from the Flock (Divided), 1995, glass, painted steel, silicone, acrylic, plastic cable ties, stainless steel, sheep and formaldehyde solution, two parts, each: 1180 x 1860 x 513 mm | 46.5 x 73.2 x 20 in, Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates, © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2013

The exhibition 'British British Polish Polish: Art from Europe’s Edges in the Long '90s and Today' – on display at the Centre for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle Warsaw until 15 November 2013 – investigates British and Polish contemporary art. Here, curator Tom Morton answers a few questions about the YBAs (Young British Artists) and their relation to legacy.

'Research makes clear that the average increase in salary is 27.4% for an undergraduate degree compared to a person with two good A levels.' Photo by Yousef AlSudais

'Research makes clear that the average increase in salary is 27.4% for an undergraduate degree compared to a person with two good A levels.' Photo by Yousef AlSudais

'Research makes clear that the average increase in salary is 27.4% for an undergraduate degree compared to a person with two good A levels.' Photo by Yousef AlSudais

Aditya Chakrabortty (The Guardian) claims that university students are the 'latest batch of guinea pigs in an experiment that has already largely failed' because there aren't enough degree-level jobs to absorb them after graduation. The British Council's John Bramwell responds with an inverse interpretation of the facts about graduate success.

South Sudan's women are more likely to die in childbirth than complete primary school. Photo courtesy of Oxfam International under Creative Commons

South Sudan's women are more likely to die in childbirth than complete primary school. Photo courtesy of Oxfam International under Creative Commons

South Sudan's women are more likely to die in childbirth than complete primary school. Photo courtesy of Oxfam International under Creative Commons

High illiteracy rates and rigid gender roles are just two of the many challenges for the women of South Sudan. Tony Calderbank, the British Council's director in South Sudan, writes about their position in local society, and how the British Council is providing training to help them overcome some of the barriers they face.

Autophagic or 'self-eating' activity in a human colon cancer cell (image courtesy of the Cell Image Library: 13914)

Autophagic or 'self-eating' activity in a human colon cancer cell (image courtesy of the Cell Image Library: 13914)

Autophagic or 'self-eating' activity in a human colon cancer cell (image courtesy of the Cell Image Library: 13914)

Biochemist Dr. Didac Carmona-Gutierrez will be presenting his research into 'self-eating' cells during European Researchers' Night at the Natural History Museum in London on 27 September. As an alumnus of the FameLab science communication competition, of which the British Council is an international partner, he will be joined by other ex-participants